Guard Young Hearts

Guard Young Hearts

Nathan, while sitting at the supper table, excitedly announced that he was three years old when the Dow Jones Industrial average topped 10,000 for the first time! It tickled me that a 7-year-old would even read that tidbit of information found in the middle of page 7 of the Linn County Leader, much less find it interesting. And while this information is innocuous, the incident was a sobering reminder that, as parents, we must continually guard our children?s eyes and ears against that which may not be edifying to them. Our children see and hear more than we may care to admit and acknowledge. We?ve been fortunate to have a fine young couple move into our rental house located along the highway. They are recently from Kentucky, although the young lady taught school here about three years ago at the Mennonite school near Linneus. Since they moved in, the furnace quit and needed replacing, the electricity had some problems that needed fixing and then the sewer line plugged up and we had to dig all that out. None of these problems were their fault and they?ve certainly shown forbearance through all these inconveniences. All 225 baby chicks arrived at the post office this week. Although we weren?t expecting them for a day or two, it didn?t take us long to get set up. The first order of business when unloading them is to dip their beaks in the water so they figure out where the water is and to get them hydrated. Chicks can be shipped safely because our Creator God designed them so that they have nourishment from the egg yolk within them for about three days after hatching. Jessica selected several different breeds, mostly good layers. She needs some of them to replenish her flock, but most are for sale in the next few months. There are also some ornamentals and bantams. We weaned last year?s spring- born calves this week. The Lord provided perfect weather for it: dry, not too hot, not too cold and lots of green grass for them to wean onto. We no longer dry lot or force our weaned calves to start eating grain at this somewhat stressful time. (Our cattle do not receive any grain while they are on our farm.) By weaning onto grass, which has been their normal diet since birth, the calves wean easily and do not experience the health problems generally associated with dry lot weaning. Since starting this practice about six years ago, we?ve treated less than 10 calves out of some 4000. Occasionally, recipes such as the following are from an old book given to me by my great Aunt Emma Falconer in 1977. Deviled Eggs ? submitted by Mrs. Larry Olesen as published by the Bethany Lutheran Church in the 1977 Centennial cookbook in Hurley, South Dakota. 8 hard-cooked farm eggs 1 tablespoon lemon juice 1 tsp prepared mustard ? tsp Bragg?s liquid aminos OR 1 tsp Worcestershire sauce ? tsp salt 1/8 tsp pepper 3 tablespoons mayonnaise Cut eggs lengthwise. Remove yolks to a medium bowl and press. Combine with remaining ingredients, then beat until smooth. Refill whites. Hints: For ease of peeling eggs, let them come to room temperature before cooking and use eggs that are at least 7 days old. Crush the shells and use them to help eliminate blossom-end rot in your growing tomatoes. Tauna Powell lives in rural Laclede, Missouri with her family. Contact her at www.mastersranch.com or atpowell@mcmsys.com

Posted: 2004-04-12


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