Locally Produced Food

Locally Produced Food

Ranch Recipes This is the week I pick up bread from my friend, Angela Bullen, who lives north of Brookfield. The past couple years she has been baking five homemade loaves of whole wheat bread for our family which I pick up every other week. Since it doesn?t contain preservatives I store it in the freezer and each loaf, when thawed, tastes fresh baked! She has started making healthy, granola-type cereal for us as well. Organic raw, whole, 2% milk, and butter is, as usual, delivered once a week on Thursdays from our friends, Kerry and Barb Buchmayer who operate a dairy east of Purdin. When Allen requests homemade ice cream, only the best cream will do, so I order that as well from time to time. Our good neighbor, Dorothy Grafton, generously shares her corn, tomato, pepper, and zucchini harvest with us. Not only does she share the bounty, but also she and Lloyd have imparted a tremendous amount of gardening knowledge to Jessica and me as we struggle to become proficient at growing our own produce. With friends who grow fruits, vegetables, pastured poultry, pastured pork, bake bread, supply forage-based organic milk and our own nuts, grass-finished beef, lamb, and pastured eggs, all of our requirements for healthy, wholesome food can be met right here in Linn County! What a boost to the financial health of a county if most of the food dollars stayed home. When referring to the virtuous woman, Proverbs 31:14 explains, ?She is like the merchant ships, she brings her food from afar.? For the entire description of a virtuous woman the passage is Proverbs 31:10-31. All of us will fall short, however, this is the Biblical pattern true believers should strive towards. Having found my web site through a web search, Mr. Lang Price from Arizona, while visiting his parents who live in Columbia, brought up his mother to visit and to purchase some grass-finished beef as well as to revisit some childhood sites. He shared this bit of family history. ?The Prices are a fairly old Missouri family. General Sterling Price was a Keytesville, MO resident from the 1830's. The Price family cemetery, located in Keytesville, holds the remains of the last living slave in the state-a girl named Sally--who died in the 1950's. My kin started Boone County National Bank in 1857. I spent every fall weekend on a farm on the north boundary of Swan Lake, just south of Sumner. What a great way to grow up. Donald Dean Foster owns it now.? Enjoy this recipe courtesy of Mr. Lang Price, in his own words. Liver and Caramelized Onions. I thawed the liver slowly and soaked in fresh water for a bit. I took a reasonable amount of olive oil and fried two big yellow onions [sliced coarsely] until they were a solid caramelized brown-20+ minutes. Remove onions to drain. Now you have an incredible onion infused frying oil for the liver, quail, dove, chicken, corndogs, cheese grits, etc. I only floured the strips and fried them to a slight medium. Served the crispy onion fries on a plate with the liver on top. New twist--old recipe. Wonderful flavor. Tauna Powell lives with her family near Laclede, Missouri. She can be reached at www.mastersranch.com or atpowell@mcmsys.com. Write to her at The Master?s Ranch, 19554 Fort Road, Laclede, MO 64651.

Posted: 2004-08-09


Reader Comments