Wintertime activities

Wintertime activities

Ranch Recipes The Finck?s and my children and I went caroling in Meadville the Thursday before Christmas. My it was brrrr cold; about 10 degrees that evening. All eleven homes were opened up for us to come in out of the cold and sing. The children really sang out with their beautiful voices. What a blessing for all involved. The Monday morning after Christmas we took down the tree and cleaned all that up since it was pretty dry by then. Those cedar trees have such a wonderful scent when first brought in, but make quite a mess when it?s time for them to go out. The children sorted through the Christmas cards; kept photos and stored the much-appreciated newsletters. The boys have been doing school lessons, while Jessica gets some time off for her birthday and she earned some time off since she has worked so far ahead. I went to check my cows up at Purdin since it warmed up a bit. I had to chop ice for them last week; much nicer now, the creek should be thawed and running good now. My chore is this is much easier than Allen?s as he has several places to go to check the water situation for the cows. There was a kink in the electric wire on one gate and that bitter cold weather caused the 12 gauge aluminum wire to snap, so the cows got onto some stockpiled grass they are not supposed to be on, so have gathered them and put them back into the proper paddock and fixed the gate. This wouldn?t have happened had I fixed it this past fall like I should have. Be careful blowing out candles. One of ours we?d let burn too low and the glass container was really hot. When I blew out the flame, the glass cracked and hot wax popped out and landed in several spots on my face, including my eyelid. That left quite a blister. The other spots just turned red and are going away. How thankful I am that it didn?t land in my eye! One of Jessica?s rams had his head stuck through a cattle panel and couldn?t get out this morning. Shetland rams have quite a set of horns, which sometimes won?t allow them to pull back through very well. Thank goodness it wasn?t one of those nights of bitter cold. He would have been pretty uncomfortable, though with as much wool as they have he would probably have been all right; just makes us feel better. We sold the last of our calves via satellite last week and loaded out this week. One load of heifers went to Iowa, and a light load of steers went to St. Johns, KS. Allen had the opportunity to visit with the driver of the Kansas truck. He is from New Zealand and was working his way around the world much like my friend Cameron Best, from Australia did back in the 80?s. Roast Beef w/Vegetables 3-4 lb chuck or rump roast 2-3 pared, sliced carrots 2-3 pared, sliced potatoes 1-2 onions, sliced (optional) ? cup water Put vegetables in bottom of crock-pot. Place roast on top of vegetables. Add water. Cover and cook on low for 10-12 hours or on high for 4-5 hours. For a new twist, try a traditional British accompaniment for the roast beef. Yorkshire pudding takes its name from Yorkshire County in northern England. Yorkshire Pudding Courtesy of Mary Ham who lives in Linneus, but is originally from Shirehampton-Bristol, England. 2 eggs 1-cup milk 1-cup flour ? tsp salt ? beef drippings Beat together eggs and milk. Sift together flour and salt. Stir into the egg mixture. Beat batter until smooth and well blended. Pour ? cup beef drippings into a baking pan (9x9x2). Pour batter into pan the bake in preheated hot oven (450 degrees) for 10 minutes. Reduce heat to 350 degrees and bake for 10-15 minutes long, or until puffy and golden-brown. Serve with roast and potatoes. Tauna Powell lives with her family near Laclede, Missouri. She can be reached at www.mastersranch.com or atpowell@mcmsys.com. Write to her at The Master?s Ranch, 19554 Fort Road, Laclede, MO 64651.

Posted: 2005-01-03


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